Parenting

Mr. 3 Goes Potty in the Night

‘Twas the night before today

When all through the house, not a creature was stirring. Not even a mouse…

When I hear a thump followed by stomp stomp stomp. A door creaked open and then another. I realized at once what it could be. Mr. 3 was going to go potty!

Continue reading “Mr. 3 Goes Potty in the Night”

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About, Parenting

Conversations with the Kids

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Mr. 3: My poop is flat!

Me: I wonder how that happened?

Mr. 3: Maybe there aren’t enough nutrients?

Me: Maybe… how do we get more nutrients?

Mr. 3: Yogurt? Yeah! I REALLY want some yogurt!


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Me: Twinkle twinkle little start…

Mr. 1: NOOO!

Me: Abcdef…

Mr. 1: NOOOOO!

Me: The stars at night, are big and bright!

Mr. 1: NOOO!

Me: Do you want me to stop singing?

Mr. 1: No!

Me: Do you like saying no?

Mr. 1: No?

Me: Do you like saying yes?

Mr. 1: *nods head emphatically*


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Me: Happy 11 week birthday!

Fetus: …

Me: We are supposed to start feeling better now!

Fetus: …

Me: Alright! Let’s have a good day! Go Team!

Fetus: …

 

Parenting

My 3 Year Old stopped napping!

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Mr. 3 has stopped napping. This is a recent development, and the transition has actually been pretty smooth. He lasted 3.5 years and for that I am so grateful! I am grateful, also, for his ability to play mostly independently while I nap.

I’m not giving up MY nap just because Mr. 3 has given up his.

I lay the 18 month old down around 12:30 and I ask Mr. 3 if he needs anything else before I lay down. Usually he just asks for his milk. Then I go lay down and try to sleep.

Sometimes he wakes me up for a good reason, usually because he has to poop.

Sometimes he wakes me up for not such a good reason, “are you awake?,” or  “can you take apart these train pieces”.

For the most part he just plays with his train set and, or his magnet tiles and patiently waits for me to wake up.

How does your family handle nap time? 

 

About, Parenting

First Trimester Tips

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(I don’t know what that second circle is, but the doctor assured me I’m only have one baby. Thank goodness!)

The first three months of pregnancy are probably the most difficult to get through. When asked, I describe myself as “miserable”. The truth is, though, that I could be feeling a lot worse! I have to remember that I am not throwing up, and I can still eat most foods as long as they are fresh. (For some reason, leftovers make me really queasy.)

Here are some tips that I have found to ease my suffering. Hopefully they work for you, too!

  1. Sea Bands – These armbands work great for motion sickness, AND they work for morning sickness too. I used these on all the cruises I’ve been on (especially when pregnant/breast feeding and unable to take Dramamine). I have gone from laying on the couch and bemoaning my misery to being able to play on the floor with the kids again. At least part of the time. It honestly does make a difference, even if it’s just in my head.
  2. Eat frequent, small, and healthy(ish) snacks. Use those few moments you feel okay to slice an apple, cucumber, or similar fruit to have ready. That way as soon as you start feeling icky you can eat a few slices and feel better. I never let me stomach get empty because that is when I feel most like vomiting.
  3. I keep a breakfast bar and bottle of water by the bed so I can have a bite before I get up in the morning.
  4. Take naps whenever you can. Insist on having some “mommy” time, even if it’s just for a quick nap. Your body is going through a lot of changes right now and exhaustion is guaranteed.
  5. Leave the house! I’m starting to realize that if you lay on the couch moaning all day, you will never feel better because all you think about is how sick you feel. But if you go out to the park or museum and are chasing two kids running in opposite directions, you have no time to feel sorry for yourself. Later you will realize that you actually felt okay. Just don’t forget to bring snacks.

Are there any tips that worked well for you? 

 

 

Health, Parenting, play, Science

Hard Hat Harry

“Mommy, please, please, please, please, can I watch more Hard Hat Harry?” says my 3-year-old in a pleading whisper.

We have a new obsession in our house here, and it is known as Hard Hat Harry. I have been a little more lax with the television time while I am suffering from the First Trimester Troubles but I still had to tell him “no” as gently as I could. We discussed it back and forth and he finally acquiesced and laid down for a nap when I said “Studies have shown that children learn more from interactive play than they do from television.” I don’t know 100% if that’s the truth but I believed it when I said it.

Television shows like Hard Hat Harry make me question such a statement, because I feel like I learn something new every time I watch them. I don’t believe I learn something new every time I play with magnet tiles. Although, I imagine the standards of learning are slightly different for an adult and a 3-year-old child still exploring the world.

Some things I have learned from our new favorite show:

  1. Airplanes are SUCKED into the sky! The way the air flows over the wings creates a suction effect that lifts the airplanes into the sky.
  2. There is a kind of truck that carries its own bridge on its back. It lays out the bridge, drives over, and picks it up again!
  3. An Orange tree grows an average of 1,500 oranges in one growing season!
  4. Nuts are harvested by a machine called a Tree Shaker. It literally shakes the tree so all the ripe nuts fall off and then sucks them up like a vacuum.

Hard Hat Harry was filmed in the mid 90’s, so the picture quality might not be what you are used to, but he is a genie that takes a detailed look at many of the topics our kids are fascinated with.

Yesterday when Mr. 3 was asking to watch more Hard Hat Harry, I told him that our bodies needed to be engaged in order to stay strong and grow. Later he said, “I’ve been playing really hard! Can I watch Hard Hat Harry now?”

What are your favorite educational TV shows? How long do you let your kids watch? 

Parenting

Baby

I don’t want to pretend to be a baby, I want to be a real baby! – 3 year old

I must have jinxed myself in my blog post yesterday when I said that Mr. 3 has been diaper free for 3 weeks. Last night he asked to wear a diaper to bed and has been wearing one all day today. When I asked him if he wanted to go peepee in the potty he deliberately peed in the diaper.


Thankfully he ran to the potty when he had to poop, and all by himself! I was in the other bathroom brushing my teeth and he came in and announced he was potty trained. Then he asked to wear a diaper again.

😦

It is probably his fear that the new baby will be here soon and take up a lot of attention. I need to show him that he is loved and try to be patient. 


Hopefully this setback will not last the year and a half the last setback lasted.

Mr. 1 is showing some interest in the potty and gets mad when I put diapers on him, but he has not successfully done any business in the potty. 

Daily Lessons, Parenting

Being Helpful

My kids love being helpful. I know it can be frustrating when they start sweeping the ceiling, or that vacuuming takes 8 times as long. And yet, it is in our best interest to let them help! They are learning important lessons such as helping and caring for others, taking care of themselves and their belongings, teamwork, problem solving, fine and gross motor coordination, and SO much more.  Continue reading “Being Helpful”

Parenting

Ask more questions

It’s funny how when you buy a car you start seeing it everywhere. Or when you (or your spouse) are pregnant you start noticing pregnant women everywhere. 

I read an interesting quote from Alfie Kohn’s Unconditional Parenting and it opened my eyes to dealing with some of my 3 year old’s behavior.

I almost always answer his questions directly, but this may not be ideal. Apparently, it could be very beneficial for him to think up some answers on his own.

Even when we’re unwilling to give kids the last word, we can still give them the first word— that is, a chance to make their case. Thus, when children ask whether it’s okay to do something, it often makes sense to respond with “Well, what do you think?” This lets them know that their viewpoint counts, and also invites them to play an active role in considering the implications of their request.

After I read this, I noticed Mr. 3 would ask me behavior questions. Perhaps it is coincidence, but I had never really heard him do this before. I decided that he should have the chance to decide a few things.

Mr. 3: Does Blippi put his feet on the table? (Read: can I put my feet on the table ?)

Me: …What do you think?

Mr. 3: No, he doesn’t. 

And he didn’t put his feet on the table, which is an improvement because when he is a baby (as opposed to a dog, a squirrel, Blippi, or anything) he and his brother tend to get in contests to see who can put their feet on the table and scream the loudest.

Mr. 3: *giggles while reaching into the toilet a little* Does Blippi touch the toilet water?

Me: (Thinking: EW you JUST peed in there!!) … What do you think?

Mr. 3: *takes hand out* No, he doesn’t.

And later he asked if Blippi sleeps with his hat on and decided that, yes, he does sleep with his hat on. This is not something worth arguing about so I agreed. He took the hat off a few minutes later because it was hot and\or itchy, but it was his choice.

By the way, it’s been over 24 hours since I yelled at my kids, and I am feeling strong!

Parenting

Guilt

I was complaining to my mother a few weeks ago about how much I had been yelling at my kids, and her response was simply, “You are going to feel that way for the rest of your life. I still feel guilty today.”

That is both depressing and terrifying and I dont want to feel that way.

For the most part I remember my childhood quite fondly, and was good friends with my mom throughout my teenage years and still today. But if there is a way to avoid the blow ups and yelling and dragging across the room by the hair ( I will never let you forget), then I need to learn it now. Rumor has it that adolescents are even more infuriating than 3 year olds.

They may look like angels…

I started reading Unconditional Parenting by Alfie Kohn and he is saying all the right things. He is saying that parenting is hard, really hard, and that we all make mistakes. He is saying our number one job is to love our children and that sometimes the things we do to them make them forget that we do love them.He is saying with an open mind and heart we can change. We don’t have to yell at our children, we have to listen to them. We don’t have to put them in time out to cry inconsolably and forget the reason why, we have to comfort them and explain, show them a better way to do things.

Hindsight is always clearer and it’s so darn difficult in the heat of the moment to remember these things. For example, Mr. 3 poked me in the eye with his toothbrush and did not listen to me in my repeated requests to acknowledge me, brush his teeth, and put on his diaper. He would periodically and with increasing frustration say, “my name is Morgan!”

Well, that is NOT the name I gave him, and in MY increasing frustration I kept not calling him Morgan, which made him not listen to me. Finally I yelled, and then I cried, and then I apologized and said I needed a moment to calm down. Then I realized my mistake, and apologized for calling him the wrong name and I asked him to be patient with me because I had been calling him — for 3 years and it’s hard to stop. He told me he was happy now and we proceeded to read stories and finish getting ready for bed.

I know I have a lot to learn, and lots of patience to build up. I want to try though, because I love my children and I want what is best for them. I want to listen to them, respect them, and teach them some better problem solving skills than I currently possess. I definitely do NOT want to yell at them again as it is bad for everyone involved.